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Ditto speaks about the potter and the clay from Jeremiah

By Daisy Rodriguez

Campbellsville, KY - Shajuana Ditto spoke about God molding us even if we're broken at Campbellsville University's chapel recently.

"God is the potter, and you are his clay," she said.


Ditto is a two-time graduate of Campbellsville University. Ditto earned her Bachelor of Science in Sports Ministry with a minor in Athletic Coaching from Campbellsville University in 2009. She also earned a Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership from Campbellsville University in 2013. She is a 2005 graduate of Meade County High School.

She read Jeremiah 18:1-6: "This is the word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: 'Go down to the potter's house, and there I will give you my message.' So I went down to the potter's house, and I saw him working at the wheel. But the pot he was shaping from the clay was marred in his hands; so the potter formed it into another pot, shaping it as seemed best to him.

Then the word of the Lord came to me. He said, 'Can I not do with you, Israel, as this potter does?' declares the Lord. "Like clay in the hand of the potter, so are you in my hand, Israel."

Ditto said God is in control and not us. We are His "workmanship." She said we are created for good works.

"God shapes us in a way that is best suited for Him. He shapes our lives by giving us different talents, different athletic abilities, different personalities, different educational opportunities or influential friendships," Ditto said.

She said sometimes we think we know what is best for us. We don't open up to Him for Him to do his work upon us, and we tend to see the aftermath of that she said.

"God as potter, begins to mold us. He begins to transform us. He begins to shape us and makes us into who He made us to be," Ditto said.

She read from Jeremiah 1:5: "Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, Before you were born I set you apart for my holy purpose. I appointed you as a prophet to the nations."

Ditto said at first she didn't want to speak at chapel. But she knew there was more for her, and she needed to speak to someone at chapel through God.

She read Jeremiah 18:4: "But the pot he was shaping from the clay was marred in his hands; so the potter formed it into another pot."

Ditto said, from this verse, we are not a waste. He's not going to throw us away she said. She said the meaning of "marred," which is ruined, damaged, wrecked or defected.

"There are students who are broken. There are students going through depression. You may feel like the weight of the world is upon you, but let me say God is with you. You are molded for more," Ditto said.

She continued to show a display of pots. She grabbed a hammer and broke a pot -- showing us that God will still use the broken.

"God will never throw us away. In his hands, the potter formed it into another pot; shaping it as it seemed best to him," Ditto said.

Ditto received the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for her servant leadership and Christian commitment at Campbellsville University. She also served as Student Government Association vice president and was involved with the Upward Basketball and Lady Tigers Volleyball team.

Ditto has authored a book titled, "Single Until...: Strategies for Standing on the Promises of God While in Solitude."


This story was posted on 2022-03-06 20:31:38
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Ditto speaks about the potter and the clay from Jeremiah



2022-03-06 - Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Chosalin Morales.
Shajuana Ditto gives a demonstration using flower pots and a hammer to show God still has a purpose for us even when we're broken.

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