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Unique Valentine Traditions Around The World

By David Contreras
Student Employee at Lindsey Wilson College ISP

Argentina: Argentinians don't celebrate Valentine's Day in February, but "the week of sweetness" in July. It's the day when lovers exchange kisses and receive chocolates and other sweets. In the country, the day actually started as a commercial invention but later became Valentine's traditions. The "Sweetness' Week" is the first week of July, from 1st to 7th July. It was established in 1989 in Argentina as a result of the advertising campaign "a candy for a kiss" created by the brand Arcor. It was part of a marketing strategy to increase sales. The slogan of this particular week is a candy for a kiss.

France: It is believed that the first ever Valentine's Day card was originated in France, when Charles, the Duke of Orleans, sent love letters to his wife from the prison in 1415. And the French village called "Valentine" turns into the epicentre of romance between 12th and 14th February.


One can see the beautiful yards, trees, and homes decorated with love cards, roses, and proposals for marriage flake. It probably is the most beautiful Valentine's Day traditions in the world.

Japan: Japan does it quite differently. It is celebrated on 14th Feb and women buy gifts and chocolates for their male companions or lovers. Men can't return gifts until March 14, which is called the "white day". On March 14, in Japan, Taiwan and even South Korea, people will be celebrating a kind of second Valentine's Day, known as White Day. While Valentine's Day in the West is a give-and-receive event, where couples exchange chocolates and gifts, it works a bit differently in Japan and other countries.

England: On Valentine's day in England, women used to place five bay leaves on their pillows. This was done with an aim to bring dreams of their future husbands. In Norfolk, Jack Valentine acts as a Santa for Valentine's day. Children anxiously wait for Santa, though they don't get to see Old Father Valentine.

South Africa: Like many parts of the world, South Africa celebrates Valentine's Day with festivals, flowers and other tokens of love. It's also customary for women in South Africa to wear their hearts on their sleeves on February 14th; women pin the names of their love interest on their shirtsleeves, an ancient Roman tradition known as Lupercalia. In some cases, this is how South African men learn of their secret admirers.


This story was posted on 2020-02-13 19:29:28
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