ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 





























 
Carol Perkins: Those cataracts!

Update: 1) Guy's second cataract surgery and how the males of the species rank as patients, high second from the top. 2) The latest tomato harvest. and 3) A follow-up for those asking if author has babysat Winston. Answers follow. Click on headline for complete column.
Next earlier Carol Perkins column: Carol Perkins: The oldest living graduate of Edmonton High
Click on headline for complete column
By Carol Perkins

Those Cataracts!

Like fourteen people before him that day, Guy had cataract surgery last week. Three weeks ago, he had the right eye done and last week was in the other one. The first surgery went as smooth as silk. He hopped out of the wheelchair declaring he could see better than he had when he was a boy. "Keep those dark glasses on in the sun," I warned him. I had been through this years ago and knew the routine. He was a good patient; it's easy to be good when all goes well.




After the second surgery he didn't hop out of the wheelchair declaring how well he could see. "This eye is cloudy; I can't see anything," he said from the passenger's side. "It is also burning." I suggested we go back, but he wanted only to get home, find a Tylenol, and go to bed. Once at home and two pills down the drain, he announced he couldn't see the hands on the clock-a big clock. "I'm calling." The nurse said that no eyes are alike and to give it a few hours. I didn't know how many hours I could stand. The healing is different, but he seemed to be taking his time getting there. What if he goes blind?

By this morning, he could read the clock and was a little more relaxed. By the time we went back for the checkup he was about at 90% of what he will be. However, it was not without much fretting. As we women all know, most men do not make good patients. He asked the doctor if he could lift a five gallon can of gas to fill up his mower to mow the yard the next day. What was the hurry? We went to eat and he sat (without those black glasses that are death dark) right in front of a sun-filled window (I pulled the blinds). "Guy, you've got to take care of yourself. You're not supposed to be in bright places right now." He vowed the doctor didn't say that. How would he know; he was loose as a goose!

Thank goodness for surgeons like our doctor who know how to remove cataracts so people can live productive lives long into their golden years. My great-grandmother was blind in her senior years likely from cataracts. A surgery that takes such a short amount of time produces incredible results. "I didn't know our TV was so bright," he said. "I also didn't know I looked so old." Well, there are some drawbacks.

Note: Guy got only three tomatoes off his sky-high vines. Also, people have asked if I have babysat Winston, the dog, again. Winston died and it was such a sad time for my nephew and all of us who loved him.


This story was posted on 2018-09-06 07:14:09
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.



 





























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


Looking for a story or picture?
Try our Photo Archive or our Stories Archive for all the information that's appeared on ColumbiaMagazine.com.

 

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270.403.0017


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.