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Mike Watson: When travel was harder, folks travelled no less

History tells us that in long years past, friends and kin would strike out from Adair County for Missouri, Texas, and destinations more far-flung like Oregon, New Mexico and California, with the idea that they may never have the opportunity to walk the green fields of home again. Some did return, some only hoped to." - MIKE WATSON.
Click headline for the stories of two, one who went to Osborne County, Kansas, the other to Corvallis, Oregon, of the latter

By Mike Watson, Adair County Historian

There was a time when travel was much harder, but that does not mean folks traveled less. In this time of rapid travel, whether by air or surface, we may be across the expanse of the nation in mere hours, or a few days at most.



History tells us that in long years past, friends and kin would strike out from Adair County for Missouri, Texas, and destinations more far-flung like Oregon, New Mexico and California, with the idea that they may never have the opportunity to walk the green fields of home again. Some did return, some only hoped to.

Here is a news item from December 1888 printed in an Osborne County, Kansas, paper of the coming of a family to settle:

"Mr. Zachary Taylor and family, of Glenville, Adair County, Ky., arrived here last week, and have taken up their residence on the Jacob Schweitzer place, northwest of the city, and will cultivate the same next year. Mr. T. is said to be a farmer of considerable experience, and one who always raises the best of everything."

And an obituary of a native who left old Adair in 1846 for the wilds of the Pacific Northwest, never to return; from the Corvallis Gazette, Corvallis, Oregon, February 1888:

"At Independence, on Monday, February 6, 1888, E.D. Dice, aged 72 years. The funeral was held at the South Methodist church of that place at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning. The deceased was an old pioneer, born in Adair County, Kentucky, and come to Oregon in 1846, and was a soldier in the Cayuse Indian war with Col. Nesmith, Judge Kelsey, and others in 1847 and 1848.



This story was posted on 2018-08-26 12:02:38
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