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Carol Perkins: The Case of the Missing Keys Part II

Previous Column: The Case of the Missing Keys

By Carol Perkins

Guy called AAA, and we waited almost an hour for a guy to come from another job. I had gone without food too long, so we drove through a Taco Bell, where I hadn't eaten in years. With my burrito dripping down my hand, we went back to the parking lot of the consignment shop and waited. I could have shopped some more but wasn't in the mood.

The guy with the tow truck couldn't get the flashers to stop and couldn't maneuver the gear shift to put it in neutral. "Evidently, too much coffee is down in there." Guy looked at me, and I looked away. Yes, I have had coffee slush out a few times, but I thought I had wiped it up!

He had no choice but to "drag" it (whatever that means) onto the back of the truck. We had previously called the local dealership, so they were aware of the situation and ready for the vehicle. We followed the tow truck headed down Scottsville Road.


The guys at the dealership couldn't have been nicer; however, they couldn't reprogram the old fob on the spot. It was past dead. We left my vehicle and waited for the call. Three days later, a call came, but not from the dealer. "We found your keys," the lady at the consignment shop said. "They were under the Junior Section. I don't remember dropping or laying them anywhere in the store. "I don't know how we missed them," she said. I was so relieved, but the guy at the dealership had already ordered a new fob, so I wasn't going to tell them.

After a week, the call came that my vehicle was ready. The battery was charged (the flashers finally ran the battery down), both fobs were programmed, and I could pick it up. I was so happy to have my wheels under me.

During this episode, I had a sense of what it is like for those who get to an age where their keys are taken away. Not literally, but when their children decide it is time to park the car. Our vehicles are part of the family, and I missed mine while it was on vacation! I had to drive Guy's car or the truck, but I wasn't without transportation, even though driving those wasn't like having my own.


You can contact Carol at carolperkins06@gmail.com.


This story was posted on 2022-09-22 13:05:46
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