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Former baseball player, Singleton, to speak at CU chapel

By Ariel C. Emberton, staff writer/photographer,
CU Office of University Communications

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. - "Nobody chooses their skin color, so why would I ever hate you for yours? And why would you ever hate me for mine?" Chris Singleton said.

Singleton, a former baseball player for the Chicago Cubs and inspirational speaker, will speak at Campbellsville University's chapel service Oct. 14 at 10 a.m.

According to his website, Singleton's mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was murdered along with eight other victims at Mother Emanuel AME church in downtown Charleston, S.C. in 2015 by a white male who wanted to start a race-related war in the United States.

Singleton forgave the man who murdered his mother and said, "Love is stronger than hate."


He uses his personal experiences of adversity and his belief that God can guide people through any storm to inspire his audiences.

Singleton has traveled across the country speaking to over 60,000 students and has spread his message through various media outlets. He has been featured on ESPN's E:60, Sports Illustrated magazine, CNN and USA Today.

Some of the topics Singleton speaks on includes Unity and Race Reconciliation, Faith and Forgiveness, Diversity and Inclusion, Overcoming Adversity and Power of Teammates.

Singleton spoke in 2019 at Campbellsville University's Diversity and Community Dialogue.

All chapels are televised on WLCU (Comcast Cable channel 10 and digital channel 15), streamed on Campbellsville University's Facebook page and wlcutv.com and can be found at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGOyyKyrGBpSx8-uXa4NRtw.

Campbellsville University is a widely acclaimed Kentucky-based Christian university with more than 11,900 students offering over 100 programs of study including Ph.D., master, baccalaureate, associate, pre-professional and certification programs. The website for complete information iswww.campbellsville.edu.


This story was posted on 2020-10-13 07:13:18
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Nobody ever chooses their skin color - why hate?



2020-10-13 - Taylor County, KY - Photo by Ariel C. Emberton.
"Nobody chooses their skin color, so why would I ever hate you for yours? And why would you ever hate me for mine?" Chris Singleton, a former baseball player for the Chicago Cubs and inspirational speaker, will speak at Campbellsville University's chapel service Oct. 14 at 10amET/9amCT. Singleton's mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was murdered along with eight other victims at Mother Emanuel AME church in downtown Charleston, S.C. in 2015 by a white male who wanted to start a race-related war in the United States.

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