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History Monday: Random Thoughts

Or: Do not mess with an Adair County boy--or a lightening rod peddler--they won't like it!

By Mike Watson

Mr. F. Winfrey, proprietor of the Columbia Hotel, had an altercation with James D. Lyons, the Columbia and Campbellsville stage and express agent, in which Lyons received a very painful wound from an improved Colt's fired at him by Winfrey. Three shots were fired by Winfrey, two hitting Lyons, only one breaking the skin. Lyons was unarmed, but made the first assault.--The Cincinnati Daily Star, Cincinnati, OH, 15 December 1879.

Columbia Spectator: A difficulty occurred in this place last Monday, about half-past five o'clock, between Mr. J.W. Turk, of Milltown, and Dr. J.K. Nell, of Gradyville. It seems that there has been an old feud existing between the parties for years, and meeting on the corner, near Mr. Kemp's drug store, some words passed, when Turk threw two rocks, Nell dodging them both. Nell then threw at Turk, hitting him upon the shoulder, and immediately rushing on him, cut him once with a pocketknife.--The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY, 11 July 1879.



Tom Hall, Louisville correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer and Police News (so he says), was kicked all around the public square at Columbia, Adair County, by a lightening-rod peddler about whom he had been wagging a slanderous tongue. We know Hall, and will bet that the kicker had to fumigate his boots after the performance.--The Breckenridge News, Cloverport, KY, 25 December 1878.

Columbia Spectator: Mr. W.J. Page, of this place, agent for the Howe Sewing Machine Co., was attacked by robbers last Friday evening, near Shelby City, and shot, the ball entering the right side, making a slight wound. He was also struck upon the head with some kind of heavy instrument. The robbers then pulled him from his wagon and got $204. It is thought the authorities have some clue to the robbers.--Owensboro Examiner, Owensboro, KY, 9 August 1878.


This story was posted on 2020-05-04 07:10:04
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