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Kentucky Color: Visiting Thanksgivings Past

By Billy Joe Fudge

H G Wells brought time travel into the cultural lexicon with his novel, The Time Machine in 1895. Ever since, the idea of being able to physically visit the past or transport to some far off point in future time has been in the public arena of thought and debate.

As to the possibility of physical time travel, we will just have to leave that up to the future to determine. However, there are two well established modes of time travel available to us today; imagination and memory.

Right near the dawn of humanity at the Tower of Babel, God Himself said, "nothing will be restrained from mankind, which they have imagined to do". Since then, nary a thing has man or woman ever done which was not preceded by a thought or mental picture, an imagining if you will. Our imaginations have allowed us to visit far away destinations of time and place. Our imaginations have allowed us to envision a time when we could travel cross country by rail, by automobile, experience the freedom of flight like a bird, travel beyond Earth's atmosphere, orbit the Earth, travel to the Moon and now we imagine traveling to Mars and beyond.

Yes, imagination can carry us forward from the present but a much more treasured trip for most of us who are getting a little long in the tooth is made possible by our memories of times past.


Memories allow us to visit about every time and place and allow us to run those special movies of our lives, over and over and over again.

Just about anything can trigger a memory of one of those special movies. Case in point, this week while looking at timber for a landowner I happened upon this rotting stump covered by Puffball Mushrooms. Immediately, I was transported back to Thanksgiving squirrel hunting trips and quail hunts with friends and family during the Thanksgiving Season and on Thanksgiving Day. How sweet it is to be able to re-live special times with special friends and family, thanks to our memories.

After taking some time standing there by this Puffball covered stump surfing through the Thanksgiving Season movies of my life, I wondered about how many decades it had been since I had exploded a Puffball. I wondered if after all this time, would I still have the touch. I wondered it I could still release multiple millions of Puffball spores with one swift stroke of a stick. Then I wondered that I should maybe stop wondering and create another movie that my memory might just bring back to visit again in two or three decades.

There was a time, not too long ago when about every young person had had multiple experiences with Puffballs; had exploded them with stick or stone and proudly watched the smoke of spores dissipate on the breeze. For those who've never had this experience and maybe never will; enjoy my new memory!

Happy Thanksgiving to all and may your lives be filled with joyful memories aplenty and Puffball smoke dissipating on the breeze.


This story was posted on 2019-11-28 06:56:52
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Kentucky Color: Visiting Thanksgivings Past



2019-11-28 - Adair Co., KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
Billy Joe writes, "This week while looking at timber for a landowner I happened upon this rotting stump covered by Puffball Mushrooms. Immediately, I was transported back to Thanksgiving squirrel hunting trips and quail hunts with friends and family during the Thanksgiving Season and on Thanksgiving Day."

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