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Dr. Lafayette Page of Adair County

A son of The Shire goes forth and does quite well. Upon his passing, the Adair County News said of Dr. Page that "No son of Adair county has ever led a more useful life or made a more illustrious name for themselves in their chosen profession."

By JIM

Ninety years ago today -- July 14, 1929 -- Adair native Dr. Lafayette Page died at his home near Indianapolis.

Dr. Page, born in Columbia in 1863, was graduated from the Columbia Christian School and in the mid-1880s, started attending the Louisville Medical School. From there, he practiced in Indianapolis for a few years before going abroad the Munich, Germany, to study for the specialty in which he was interested, the ear, nose and throat.

While in Germany, he met and fell in love with Miss Marion Heinly, a musically inclined young woman from Illinois. Lafayette and Marion were married in Geneva, Switzerland in the mid 1890s.

Among Dr. Page's many accomplishments was organizing and generously donating to the [James Whitcomb] Riley Memorial Hospital for Crippled Children in Indianapolis.


During World War I, he accepted a commission in the Army and served in hospitals in France, where he developed an effective treatment for those who had fallen victim to mustard gas, a scourge of war introduced by the German army.

Upon his passing, the Adair County News commented that Dr. Page had friends around the globe in all walks of life and that "No son of Adair county has ever led a more useful life or made a more illustrious name for themselves in their chosen profession."

Dr. and Mrs. Page, a pianist of some note, parented three children, two of whom rose to national prominence in their own chosen fields.

Ruth Page, the middle child, ascended to fame shortly after World War I and for seven decades held sway as one of the most influential 20th century figures in American dance as performer, choreographer, and patron. (Read more about Ruth: JIM: Sidda, dancing, evokes memories of Ruth Page)

Irvine Heinly Page, the youngest child, was a leading physiologist for decades who revolutionized research and treatment of hypertension and held the directorship of research for twenty years at the famed Cleveland Clinic. In the fall of 1955, his photograph graced the cover of Time Magazine. In some capacity or another, the younger Dr. Page remained an active force in the national medical community for nearly sixty years.



Major Lafayette Page, MD commanded the Nose, Throat and Ear Department at Base Hospital 32 in France during WWI.


This story was posted on 2019-07-14 08:18:01
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Dr. Irvine Page and a lab tech at Cleveland Clinic in the 1960's



2019-07-14 - Cleveland, OH - Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.
Irvine Heinly Page, the youngest child of Adair County native Dr. Lafayette Page, was a leading physiologist who revolutionized research and treatment of hypertension and held the directorship of research for twenty years at the famed Cleveland Clinic. In the fall of 1955, his photograph graced the cover of Time Magazine.

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