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Kentucky Color: Research Results Released

Do you suspect that all modern cars look increasingly similar? The researchers at GWSU have proven statistically that the only current choice is among shades of grey.

By Billy Joe Fudge

Great Wooded South University's Psychology Department has just completed research into a truly disturbing American phenomenon. Because this phenomenon has just been identified, it does not yet have a name. GWSU commissioned this research in response to the question, "what has happened to identifiable uniqueness in America and the American Automobile Industry?"

This research was conducted on consumer demand for variety in style and color of the automobile because there is so much historical data to draw upon. This historical data goes back to 1909 when Henry Ford was cranking out Model T's on the world's only moving assembly line. The car only cost $240 and was in high demand and supposedly because black paint dried faster than any other color, Henry Ford said, "you can have any color car you want, as long as it is black"! So, the American people accepted what was available to them.



Then as time went on and with multiple car companies around the US and the world developing multiple models and styles in a plethora of colors in an effort to present the consumer with an automobile with identifiable uniqueness, only black became a thing of the past. To get something unique meant there could be an up charge in order to acquire that bit of uniqueness and most American's seemed to be willing to pay for that uniqueness.

This quest for uniqueness seems to have peaked during the muscle car era during the late 60's and 70's. Every car manufacturer bragged about the numbers of yellows, greens, blues, reds, golds, browns in their inventory of colors and then, even reached a crescendo with two color or as they were called, two-tone autos rolling off the assembly lines in record numbers. Since then however, the variety of models and colors offered to car buyers has steadily diminished to this very day.

Now, because of federal fuel efficiency guidelines, which require less heavy and more streamlined, aerodynamic models, most vehicle manufacturer's models are distinguishable only by the company logo. This is "strike one" against being able to purchase an automobile with identifiable uniqueness.

This is where the GWSU's research has come into play. Our research has identified "strike two". After two years of performing color analysis from aerial and satellite photographs of automobile dealer lots, public and private parking lots and even counts of colors of vehicles traveling on country roads to interstates, the data is disturbing. According to our research 91% of 10 year old and younger vehicles on the road are either white, black or nuances of gray. Another 6% are red or a nuance of red. This leaves only 3% of vehicles on the road that might fall into the yellow, green, blue, gold, brown, etc. or nuances of these brighter colors.

We Americans have certainly lost our way when it comes to identifiable uniqueness. The question is why? Why have we lost our way into a world of, no color? Why have we become complacent when it comes to color? Why have we settled for the mundane? White and Black are technically not even colors in that a color is produced by a particular wavelength of light. White contains all wavelengths of light, black has no wavelengths of light and since gray is produced by mixing black and white it is also not a color, so to speak.

What is next? Are we soon to be yawning at a rainbow? Will we be found dozing at a beautiful sunset? Will we be happy with broom sedge bouquets rather than bold reds soft yellows and passionate pink arrangements?

Much more research to be done by the GWSU Psychology Department. What is next and what does it mean for the human condition. Is there a "strike three" when it comes to identifiable uniqueness? Maybe, maybe not but never fear, Great Wooded South University will continue to lead the nation with this important work!


This story was posted on 2019-06-08 09:19:48
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Kentucky Color: Shades of Grey



2019-06-08 - Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
According to our research 91% of 10 year old and younger vehicles on the road are either white, black or nuances of gray. Another 6% are red or a nuance of red. This leaves only 3% of vehicles on the road that might fall into the yellow, green, blue, gold, brown, etc. or nuances of these brighter colors.

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