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Epicurean Kentuckian: Worry du jour: CNN's Dirty Dozen story

Just a huge worry for a respite from the big worry the Pythons gave us, "The Baggage Retrieval System they have at Heathrow."
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By Ed Waggener

What do you do when some of the popular health food experts issue dire warnings about risks in your favorite raw foods?

Yesterday, a standing-truth belief that fresh vegetables are more nutritious and better, came under challenge from a CNN story, Dirty Dozen listing foods, which, eaten raw, most often contain a high level of pesticide residue.


The article gives preference to certified organic products, though they come under criticism for being too expensive for average food budgets.

But it also advised that cooking fresh produce reduces the pesticide level.

The one in the accompanying photo has celery, red pepper, chopped onions, mushrooms, asparagus, turkey-hidden-by fried egg, and a mediterraneanly-charred onion.

So I wonder: What is the status of organic farming in Adair County? And wouldn't be a gold mine at this time if the whole county were certified organic? So that our garden crops could command top dollar?

And a word on milk

By the way, haven't been able to get the word on what big ag and mega-companies are doing to our local dairy farmers prospects. And whether any of our farmers are selling to Dean Foods.

Recent articles in the Nelson County and Marion County weekly newspapers cite a huge reduction in the number of dairy farms in Nelson and Marion and we just hope it's not happening here.

In support of them, and on the recommendation of Sammy Baker, milk was the beverage of choice this morning. - EW


This story was posted on 2018-04-13 11:13:16
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Epicurean Kentuckian: When foods labelled among Dirty Dozen



2018-04-13 - Columbia, KY - Photo by Ed Waggener, ColumbiaMagazine.com.
What do you do when some of the popular health food experts issue dire warnings about risks in your favorite raw foods? Yesterday, a standing-truth belief that fresh vegetables are more nutritious and better, came under challenge from a CNN story, Dirty Dozen listing foods, which, eaten raw, most often contain a high level of pesticide residue. The article gives preference to certified organic products, though they come under criticism for being too expensive for average food budgets. But it also advised that cooking fresh produce reduces the pesticide level. At least two of our favorites which made the list are used in an occasional quick breakfast mix. This one has celery, red pepper, chopped onions, mushrooms, asparagus, turkey-hidden-by fried egg, and a mediterraneanly-charred onion. - EW

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