ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 

























 
Eulogy for a Peach Tree

'Yesterday (August 11), when I stopped on my way home to observe the fruit, the once-vital leaves that were once suspended at a jaunty angle on branches of this tiny tree were hanging limply downward, their glossy green blackening from callously sprayed poisons.' - JOYCE COOMER
Click on headline for complete story with photo(s)

By Joyce M. Coomer
Commentary/Guest Editorial

To those who truly respect the Earth and mourn the needless and untimely deaths of any living thing, I wish to tell a story of unforgivable loss that occurred this week.

In March of this year, along the roadside one morning I noticed a bright pink speck. I turned my vehicle around and retraced my route slowly so I could hopefully identify that spot of pink. It was one of several blossoms on a spindly tree that had green leaves just beginning to emerge. These vibrant pink blooms brightened my mornings for several days, and I often stopped to watch them sway in gentle spring breezes.


I observed this small tree throughout the spring and most of this summer as the leaves fully emerged, glossy green and healthy, sometimes stationary, other times bouncing merrily in a brisk wind.

Fruit appeared. A fruit with which I was unfamiliar. A fruit growing on the tips of the boughs, something I had not seen before and something I could not find in exploration of numerous sources of reference.

The fruit grew, slowly but surely. A fortnight ago, I noticed a faint blush of pink appearing on this once dull green fruit. The fruit grew a little more and began to resemble a peach. What kind of peach, I did not know, but I stopped daily to note any minuscule growth and further deepening of the pink hue. I wondered when the fruit would be ripened fully and would offer an opportunity to partake of its flavor.

This past weekend, I noted that the pink tint had deepened to a pink nearly the brightness of the springtime bloom. I stopped morning and evening to observe the minute changes in the color and size of this fruit. As the pink tone hadn't deepened noticeably since Sunday past (August 6), I decided to descend the steep roadside bank, take photographs and check the ripeness of the fruit this weekend.

Alas, that excursion is not to be.

Yesterday (August 11), when I stopped on my way home to observe the fruit, the once-vital leaves that were once suspended at a jaunty angle on branches of this tiny tree were hanging limply downward, their glossy green blackening from callously sprayed poisons.

That beautiful little tree will not bloom next spring. There will no bright spots of pink on the roadside. There will be no fruit for anyone to sample.

The loss of this small tree will mean nothing to those who believe it is their right to indiscriminately eliminate things they dislike and who care not that in the process they defile this wonderful planet. They did not appreciate the beauty of this diminutive tree, nor will they ever wonder about the flavor of its fruit.

As for me and my heart, mourning for this wonder of God will last many years. I will see the gap in the fencerow, the lack of color against the shade of the woodland, the missing sheen of light on the leaves . . . and mourn.

Joyce M. Coomer



This story was posted on 2017-08-12 12:18:16
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


Welcome Back, Lindsey Wilson College Students!!!
Columbia/Adair County has missed you. You've come home to a warm, welcoming community for your Fall Semester. The community wishes you the greatest Success. We hope you'll find a college hometown as wonderful as the one you left. (Suggestion homework this weekend recommended by JIM: Encore Classic: Gordon Crump - 'How I discovered Columbia . . . ')

 

To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

Eulogy for a Peach Tree - Callously poisoned



2017-08-12 - Near Fairplay, KY - Photo by Joyce Coomer.
"This beautiful little tree will not bloom next spring. There will no bright spots of pink on the roadside. There will be no fruit for anyone to sample.

The loss of this small tree will mean nothing to those who believe it is their right to indiscriminately eliminate things they dislike and who care not that in the process they defile this wonderful planet. They did not appreciate the beauty of this diminutive tree, nor will they ever wonder about the flavor of its fruit.

As for me and my heart, mourning for this wonder of God will last many years. I will see the gap in the fencerow, the lack of color against the shade of the woodland, the missing sheen of light on the leaves . . . and mourn. - JOYCE M. COOMER

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



Many attempt to stem assault on environment



2017-08-13 - Adair County, KY - Photo by Ed Waggener, ColumbiaMagazine.com.
It's heartening to know that many share Joyce Coomer's concern - Click Read More for her editorial, Eulogy for a Peach Tree - about the two and one half year old government assault on the environment, on Economic Development, on Tourism and Agri-Tourism. But it goes on, despite signs such as this one. The otherwise scenic paradise along the roadway is browned out by herbicides, trees are subjected to cavalier mutilation by boom mowers, or more accurately, "tree manglers." It's a sad message, especially for the new generation of leadership currently subjected to the devastation on rides to and from school. - EW

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



 

























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.